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    This course is designed for staff or independent contractors who want to work in the Adventure Programs conducted at 4-H Camp Bristol Hills during the Spring, Summer or Fall.  This is a supplement to the in-person training which is held each year shortly before camp.  This course is NOT a certification, but will help staff to gain a solid understanding of the program before working with campers directly.

    Evaluating what you want to do and what you have available to work with are key elements to a successful new farm enterprise. This course will help you take the first steps toward setting goals, assessing the resources you have available for farming (physical, financial, and personal), and exploring what enterprises are the best fit for you and your land.

    Have an idea for a farm enterprise but not sure if it’s feasible? This course will get you started exploring the potential markets and profitability of your ideas. It picks up where BF 101: Square One left off, so follows a natural learning progression from that course. (You do not have to take BF 101 before taking BF 102; however, you will likely get more out of BF 102 if you go into it with some existing knowledge of the concepts and terminology commonly used in business planning).

    New farmers often ask “How does my enterprise officially become recognized as a farm?”, “What are the tax benefits for farmers?” and “What regulations do I need to comply with?” These questions, and many others, will be answered in this course.

    The course is for field crop, vegetable, and livestock producers who are looking for more productive soils for increased forage or crop production.

    Course Objectives:  At the completion of this course, you will
    • Understand what soil health is and why is it important.
    • Have knowledge of the characteristics of healthy soils and how to measure them.
    • Have knowledge of soil practices to improve our soil health and skills to develop a soil health improvement plan.

    This course will help new or aspiring vegetable producers to answer basic questions about site selection, crop rotation, seeding and transplants, and financial aspects of veggie production. Topics including variety selection, pre-plant preparation, and cultivation will be covered. Don’t miss BF 121, the continuation of this course, which takes you through the remainder of the growing season into harvest, post-harvest handling, and marketing.

    This course will take you from transplanting to harvest, including information on in-season fertility; integrated pest management including pest ID and control; weed control options; harvesting strategies; and tips for marketing your products. Be prepared to create an in-season fertility and pest/weed control plan as part of this course. Weekly homework will focus on preparing you to make good decisions in the coming growing season.

    If you’re exploring the idea of adding berries and bramble fruits to your farm, this course will help you consider all the aspects of this decision, from varieties and site selection all the way through profit potential and marketing.

    Many new farmers get started with poultry, because it’s a relatively low-investment enterprise with a fairly quick turnaround time from investment to revenue. The margins can be slim though, and you need all the skill you can acquire in order to produce a safe product and have a profitable enterprise. This course was designed to help!

    Woodlots are a common feature of most farms in the eastern US, and are often overlooked for the value they might bring to the landowner and to farm enterprises.  Farmers and woodland owners need to recognize the potential values of their woodland resource, be familiar with common ways a woodland can add value, and identify how the woodland will support the interests of the owner.

    During this course, we will examine the methods to assess forest resources and discuss common woodland activities such as cutting firewood, harvesting logs for mushroom cultivation, and support for wildlife and long-term forest health.

    Mushrooms are an emerging niche crop with many benefits, including improving farmer stewardship of forested lands and the ability to offer a unique and highly desired product. With a bit of practice, mushrooms can be easily grown almost anywhere and on many different materials (logs, wood chips, straw, shredded paper)

    This course trains new and experienced farmers in the background, techniques, and economics of farm scale commercial mushroom production. Students will learn the basic biology of mushrooms, cultivation techniques for shiitake, oyster, lions mane, and stropharia mushrooms, proper conditions for fruiting, management needs, and harvesting and marketing mushrooms.

    Note: In addition to weekly online readings, presentation, and discussion, participants will receive spawn in the mail and get to try mini mushroom experiments on their tabletop at home.

    Welcome aspiring sugar-makers! This course will be useful if you are exploring the possibilities of making maple syrup on your land – whether for supplemental income or for your livelihood. The material presented will assume little past knowledge of sugaring, but a background in agriculture or forestry will be very helpful.

    Mushrooms are an emerging niche crop with many benefits and offer a unique and highly desired product.

    With a bit of practice, a range of specialty mushrooms can easily be grown in a variety of locations and on many different substrates including straw, coffee grounds, and more.

    This course trains new and experienced farmers in the background, techniques, and economics of farm scale commercial production. Students will learn the basic biology of mushrooms, cultivation techniques, proper conditions for fruiting, management needs, and harvesting and marketing mushrooms.

    Note: In addition to weekly online readings, presentation, and discussion, participants will receive spawn in the mail and get to try mini mushroom experiments on their tabletop at home.

    Whether you intend to borrow money or not, heading into a farm venture without a business plan is like setting sail across the ocean without a map. Either way, you may run into disasters that can derail your venture, but if you arm yourself with a business plan, you will at least have something to aid your farm decision-making and demonstrate to yourself and your family that your ideas are feasible. This intensive, fast-paced course is designed to help you build your plan quickly and be ready for the next growing season.

    If you’ve been struggling to make your farm operation profitable without driving yourself into the ground, this financial planning course is for you. Ultimately it will help you with the delicate balancing act that all farmers must succeed in:  balancing healthy profits with healthy land and a healthy farm family and personal life.  You will learn how to make financial decisions toward farm & family values and goals, and how to build profit into your plans up front, rather than hoping there is something left once expenses are subtracted from income. If you have been struggling with the financial statements in your business plan, this is a great course to help you focus in on these and get clear on your numbers.

    This course is an introduction to QuickBooks, designed to provide an overview of the QuickBooks Pro software application. It will cover the basic features, such as sales tax, inventory, invoicing, adjustments, and year-end procedures. Each student will gain hands-on experience reproducing the exercises presented by the instructor. PLEASE NOTE: QuickBooks software is not included in this course and will need to be purchased separately if you want to use it long-term on your farm. It is possible to use the free 30-day trial for the online version of QuickBooks during this course.

    Students who demonstrate competence in each of the exercises will be able to proceed to the next unit of study. All units will build on the skills and knowledge of the previous unit. Students are recommended to take notes, participate at a steady pace to complete the course in the 6 week time frame.

    Questions and brief discussions about using QuickBooks in real-world, business environments will be entertained and answered in a discussion area, drawn from the instructor’s own experience as well as from input from other students.

    Adding weeks to either end of your growing season can mean attaining a premium for having products available well before (or long after) other local growers. But the structures that make this possible–-unheated plastic-covered “high tunnels” or “hoophouses”-–can cost a lot of money, and they bring special management considerations that need to be understood in order to be profitable additions to your farm.

    Grazing means more than simply turning livestock out onto a green area and hoping for the best. With planning and basic grazing infrastructure, you can reduce your workload, keep your animals fat and happy, and improve your soil health through grazing. In this course, you'll learn the key concepts of successful grazing operations.

    Have sheep or thinking about getting a flock? Producers of all experience levels will find something for them in this lively, wide-ranging course. There is no one right way to raise sheep – just a palette of options for you to choose from, to suit your farming objectives and lifestyle. Taught by experienced sheep producers and Cornell Cooperative Extension educators, this course will cover many different options, and strongly encourages active student participation!

    A collection of resources to assist instructors of Small Farm online courses.

    A place for new instructors to practice with Moodle features

    During the World Wars, communities came together to grow Victory Gardens.Today, we are facing a very different kind of global war -- one that calls us to stay at home instead of fighting overseas. However, there is still much that we can learn and do during our time in quarantine. Inspired by the historic efforts of the Victory Gardeners, Ontario County CCE is launching Just Plant It: COVID-19 Victory Gardens course. We want to empower our community to learn how to grow their own food and share it with others in the community. This course provides participants with step-by-step instruction about how to start and manage a small garden. This course is open to anyone, and participants will have access to course material and the option to have questions answered by Home and Grounds Educator Russell Welser.

    This course explores all the major methods of plant propagation.

    What is Organic Gardening? This course is intended to examine the basics of small-scale organic gardening. The topics and depth of information offered will help new gardeners learn the basics and feel comfortable getting started, while also offer more experienced gardeners the opportunity to expand their knowledge base. This course may not be ideal for very experienced organic gardeners.

    This course introduces garden design for homeowners and beginning gardeners wishing to enhance their personal surroundings.

    The purpose of this permaculture course in the series is to cultivate ecological literacy by looking at the complex symbiotic relationships in both natural and cultivated systems. Students will explore and apply systems thinking to their own gardens, farms, and backyards.

    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

    • Define permaculture and describe key elements of permaculture systems.
    • Read the patterns of natural landscapes and apply them to design. 
    • Discover living soil and how to regenerate and maintain soil health. 
    • Apply water harvesting techniques and mitigate water issues. 
    • Appreciate the role of trees and forests in productive conservation systems. 
    • Describe the important role of animals and aquatic systems in permaculture.

    This course is one of three that we offer in permaculture design. (Read more about Permaculture Design: Fundamentals of Ecological Design and Permaculture Design: Design Practicum

    Purpose

    Examine the basics of permaculture design and learn the potential for ecological design on a multitude of scales and contexts. Particpants will study the foundational ethics, principles, and planning tools to design ecological sites in the context of their local ecosystem and future climate change.

    Course Objectives

    Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

    • Define permaculture and describe examples of permaculture sites
    • Apply permaculture ethics and principles to a variety of contexts
    • Discuss impacts of climate change and adaption strategies
    • Consider appropriate use of energy and technology in sustainable systems
    • Understand a range of multi-purpose plants and design multi-kingdom polycultures

    The key objective for the 4.5-week long Practicum is to create a proposed design for your site based from goals and assessments made in previous coursework. Assessments and goals will be reviewed, refined, and amended. Design activities will spur creative solutions and direction for you proposal based on permaculture design principles. The final outcome of this class is a presentation portfolio of your proposed design. After completing all three classes, you will submit your final portfolio for your Permaculture Design Certificate.

    Prerequisite:
    Permaculture I: Fundamentals of Ecological Design
     or
    Permaculture Design II: Ecosystem Mimicry

    Botanical Illustration II: Working with Watercolor is a course designed to help you learn some fundamentals of watercolor painting in a supportive web-based environment.

    This course introduces basic drawing as a foundation for botanical illustration and as a medium through which students can: explore their creativity, and describe and observe the beauty of nature in a new and exciting way.

    The Garden-Based Learning Library is an online community where CCE educators can connect around horticulture resources for their regional and local Extension programming especially the core preparation and advance training of Master Gardener Volunteers.

    Learn about the beneficial insects that are the natural enemies to those pests that are in the garden.

    This course is a 'Train the Trainer' Webinar Workshop series that is being offered to Cornell Cooperative Extension educators.  The purpose of the course is to train county educators in some of the basic requirements of these plants and the basic concepts of Chinese medicine so that the educators can assist future farmers in production practices. 

    This course is reserved for QMPS Internship Students [4/27/20-6/19/20]

    This course will benefit those involved in the decision making and management of forage crops from crop selection to feed out on a dairy farm. There will be aspects of the course that are specific to northeast U.S. growing conditions and horizontal silos (bunks, trenches, drive over piles) but most of the material will be applicable to any dairy operation and storage structure.

    Topics Covered

    Fermentation and Silage Science
    Forage Variety Selection & Quality Considerations
    Forage Harvest Management
    Silage Storage & Management
    TMR Mixing Procedure & Maintenance
    Feed out and Feed Bunk Management

    Course opens March 13, 2020

    This course is designed for dairy business on-farm personnel (owner or employee) seeking to increase their knowledge of calf and heifer management. Participants should possess a formal or informal background in dairy cattle management, but not necessarily in calf and heifer management.

    Topics covered:

    • Calf Nutrition Preweaning
    • Calf Nutrition Post weaning
    • Replacement Economics
    • Colostrum Management
    • Inventory Management
    • Genetics
    • Calf Health
    • Housing

    El registro para este curso abre el 1 de Diciembre 2018

    Registration for this course opens December 1, 2018

    This course is designed for dairy business on-farm personnel (owner or employee) seeking to increase their knowledge of dairy transition cow management. Participants should possess a formal or informal background in dairy cattle management, but not necessarily in transition cow management. 


    Topics include:

    • Transition Cow Physiology/Biology
    • Nutritional Strategies for Transition Cows
    • Fresh Cow Health Management
    • Metabolic Disease
    • Non-nutritional Management
    • Monitoring Health

    This  seven week online course covers the basics of dairy cattle reproductive management and builds from there.  Participants should possess a formal or informal background in dairy cattle management but not necessarily in reproductive management.

    Topics include

    • Anatomy and Physiology
    • Synchronization Protocols
    • Breeding Strategies
    • A.I. Techniques
    • Monitoring Reproductive Programs
    • Heifer Reproduction Management

    This course is to help you learn about integrated pest management for Asian soybean aphid on soybeans. The course will focus on correct identification, its lifecycle, how to sample and monitor for the pest, determine economic threshold and management practices that can be employed.

    This course is for vegetable growers who produce cucurbits, peppers, tomatoes, and/or beans. Phytophtora blight is a serious disease that presents major challenges once on your farm. In this course you'll learn how to recognize symptoms on different susceptible crops, the biology of the pathogen, and avoidance and management strategies.


    This information was prepared by Amara Dunn, Department of Plant Pathology and Plant Microbe Biology, NYSAES, Cornell University. Contact Amara at arc55@cornell.edu with questions about the content of this module.

    FACTS ABOUT this Module: This module is approved in New York for 0.75 Core recertification credit. You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 0.75 hour. The credits are earned after completing the Pre-Test, reading and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. The last thing is to click on the certificate function. A temporary certificate generated. An official certificate will be mailed to you.

    Goals of This Module

    • Understand the life cycle of bed bugs and how they appear at each life stage.
    • Learn the basic biology of bed bugs
    • Learn about bed bug behaviors that affect control

    FACTS ABOUT this Module: This module is approved in New York for 1 Core recertification credit. You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 1 hour. The credits are earned after completing the Pre-Test, reading and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. The last thing is to click on the certificate function. A temporary certificate generated. An official certificate will be mailed to you.

    A pesticide is any substance used to control pests. Pests may be target insects, vegetation, fungi, etc. Most control the pests by poisoning them. Unfortunately, pesticides can be poisonous to humans as well. Some are very poisonous, or toxic, and may seriously injure or even kill humans. Others are relatively non-toxic. Pesticides can irritate the skin, eyes, nose, or mouth. The most important thing to remember is that you should always use caution whenever you work with any pesticide!

    Goals of This Module

    • Understand what toxicity is and how it affects humans.
    • Learn the three routes of entry (how pesticides enter the body) and the importance of each.
    • Be familiar with how toxicity is measured and what is meant by label warning statements.

    FACTS ABOUT this Module: This module is approved in New York for 1 Core recertification credit. You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 1 hour. The credits are earned after completing the Pre-Test, reading and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. The last thing is to click on the certificate function. A temporary certificate generated. An official certificate will be mailed to you.

    The words "environment" and "ecology" have been increasingly in the news. Man is beginning to fear that his daily activities may be limiting the future use of resources. Pesticide use and drift can affect air quality; pesticides in the food chain can threaten wildlife populations; and soil may no longer be suitable for optimal crop production. Pesticides are now recognized to be non-point sources of water pollution. As a result, pesticide practices are being watched closely. As pesticide applicators, it is important to do your job carefully by both controlling pest populations and at the same time protecting the environment from the potential adverse effects of pesticide use.

    Goals of This Module

    • Understand the dangers of pesticides in the environment and what causes them.
    • Be familiar with how pesticides pollute groundwater and what steps can be taken to prevent it.
    • Understand how pesticides persist in the environment.

    FACTS ABOUT this Module: This module is approved for 2 (cch) New York pesticide applicator recertification credits. The credits are earned when the applicator reads and studies the content of the module, then successfully completes the content quiz. A certificate will be sent you as proof of completing the course.

    You are an applicator working with toxic materials and are interested in safeguarding your health. You also want to protect other people and the environment from pesticide injury. Many pesticide accidents result from careless practices or ignorance. Learn safe procedures contained in this module!

    Goals of This Module

    • Learn proper safety precautions for before, during and after pesticide application.
    • Understand the importance of cleanup measures.
    • Understand the need for personal protective equipment.

    FACTS ABOUT this Module: This module is approved in New York for 1 Core recertification credit. You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 1 hour. The credits are earned after completing the Pre-Test, reading and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. The last thing is to click on the certificate function. A temporary certificate generated. An official certificate will be mailed to you.

    Pesticides can enter the body through the skin, the eyes, the mouth, and the lungs.The most common cause of pesticide poisoning for applicators is through skin contact. Some pesticides enter the body through the skin quite readily. Concentrates can be especially dangerous. Some parts of the body absorb pesticides extremely fast and need extra protection. Two such areas are the head and the scrotum. Most of a pesticide spilled on your skin is absorbed in the first few minutes. If any pesticide is spilled on you, wash it off immediately. It is best to avoid direct contact with pesticides by wearing the proper protective clothing. The pesticide label will tell you what protective equipment is necessary.

    Goals of This Chapter

    • Understand the importance of personal protective equipment worn during pesticide application.
    • Understand why there are different fabrics and materials used to protect applicators and how they differ.
    • Learn the importance of and method for layering protective clothing.
    • Learn the basics of respirators and their use.

    FACTS ABOUT this Module: This module is approved in New York for 1 Core recertification credit. You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 1 hour. The credits are earned after completing the Pre-Test, reading and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. The last thing is to click on the certificate function. A temporary certificate generated. An official certificate will be mailed to you.

    Weather-wise application can reduce pesticide hazard to the environment. A good applicator carefully checks the weather conditions before beginning spray procedures. Not only do a few simple precautions protect the environment, but in terms of dollars and cents they aid the applicator. Pesticides which do not reach or remain on the target areas are wasted. More pesticide, time, and money must be used to control the pests in the target area.

    Goals of This Chapter

    • Learn the role that weather conditions can play in both helping and hindering the applicator.
    • Understand the hazards of windy day application and who is legally responsible for mistakes.
    • Learn the advantages of early morning or evening application.
    • Understand the roles of humidity and temperature inversion in regard to pesticide application.

    FACTS ABOUT this Module: This module is approved in New York for 1 Core recertification credit. You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 1 hour. The credits are earned after completing the Pre-Test, reading and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. The last thing is to click on the certificate function. A temporary certificate generated. An official certificate will be mailed to you.

    As an applicator you have two disposal problems. First you must safely dispose of surplus pesticides concentrated or tank mixed that you have no use for or cannot store. Secondly, you must safely dispose of empty pesticide containers. Careless disposal practices are a common cause of pesticide misuse and environmental contamination. Take the time to dispose of surplus pesticides and empty containers carefully and legally. Never give empty containers away for any purpose.

    Goals of This Chapter

    • Learn the importance of preventing pesticide surplus.
    • Know what to do in case you have a pesticide surplus.
    • Understand and learn the steps taken to properly dispose of pesticide containers.
    • Learn proper procedure for triple-rinsing containers and equipment.

    Pesticide Storage

    Instructor - Ron Gardner rdg5@cornell.edu


    No job is really finished until
    the pesticides, containers, and your equipment have been put away properly. Get into the habit of storing all of your materials safely before you clean up and go home, or on to the next job. While you are cleaning up and putting away the pesticides, containers, and equipment you should wear all the personal protective equipment you used on the job. Consider wearing gloves and other protective equipment, even if they weren't recommended on the label. Spills and accidental contamination often occur during storage procedures.

    Goals of This Chapter:

    • Learn how to choose and arrange a storage are for pesticides
    • Understand the importance of handling, storing, and disposing of pesticides properly
    • Learn what to do in case of a pesticide spill

    Train the trainer course for our 30hr Core training modules

    Introduction: Welcome to the herbicide-resistant weeds training lessons, provided by the Weed Science Society of America. Herbicide resistance education and training are critical for advancing the adoption of diverse weed management programs to delay and mitigate the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds. This training lesson was developed by a team of weed scientists in an effort to provide to you, the agronomist, consultant, retailer or distributor, and interested grower, the most current information on herbicide resistance in weeds.

    FACTS ABOUT this Module: You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 1 hour. The credits are earned after completing the Pre-Test, reading and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. The last thing is to click on the certificate function. A temporary certificate will be generated. An official certificate will be mailed to you.

    Successful completion of this module will earn you 1 recertification credit for New York State DEC certified pesticide applicators in categories .....

    Here’s how it works:

    1. First, sign the course roster.
    2. Then, take the pre-test.
    3. Next, read the 'Current Status of Herbicide Resistance in Weeds' unit.
    4. Then take the post-test. You have as many tries as you need to score 80% or higher.
    5. Finally click on the "Course Completion Certificate" This is a must! Clicking here informs the course sponsor that you have finished the course requirements so we can send you an official certificate.

    This lesson presents an introduction to herbicide resistance in weeds. By the end of this lesson, you will: 


    Please sign the roster:

    This course is an introduction to ecological weed management, and covers important aspects of weed biology that will enhance your ability to manage weeds in both organic and conventional cropping systems.

    Successful completion of this module will earn you 1.5 re-certification credits for New York State DEC certified pesticide applicators in categories 1a, 3a, 3b, 6a, 9, 10, 21, 22, 23 and 25.

    Biological control is the use of natural organisms to help us control pests. These helpful organisms can be insects, bacteria, fungi, and others, but this module focuses on insect biocontrol.

    Integrated tick management (ITM) is a multifaceted approach to management of tick populations, including reduction of tick habitat, landscape management, tick-targeted chemical control, and host-targeted control. This course will review available tick control strategies, discuss the evidence-base behind these strategies for reducing tick abundance and tick-borne disease burden, and review challenges and barriers to effective tick control in real-world settings.

    At the end of this module, the student will:

    • Explain how tick biology and behavior informs approaches to control.
    • Identify control strategies targeting ticks, hosts, and environment/habitat.
    • Identify challenges to effective tick control.
    • Evaluate the efficacy of various control strategies to reduce tick abundance and to reduce tick-borne disease public health burden.
    • Describe the one health framework for addressing the threat of ticks and tick-borne disease.

    Before going into the development of an IPM (Integrated Pest Management) strategy it is important to get an idea of what IPM is.

    Here's what we hope you learn:

    • What is IPM?
    • The different components involved in an IPM strategy
    • Resources available for developing an IPM strategy

    This information was prepared by Tim Weigle. Contact him at thw4@cornell.edu with questions about this module.

    Before going into the development of an IPM (Integrated Pest Management) strategy it is important to get an idea of what IPM is. According to information found on the NYS IPM Program website,

    IPM is:

    • your choice for solid science and sound solutions in dealing with pests. The NYS IPM Program promotes safe, least-toxic solutions to both pest and pesticide problems.
    • integrated because it brings together, or integrates, a range of biological, organic, cultural, mechanical, and chemical options for pest problems. And it's about management because you can only manage pests - you can't eliminate them.
    • no longer just focused on insect pests, the range now includes fungi, bacteria, viruses, weeds, wildlife, and more.

    This information was prepared by Tim Weigle. Contact him at thw4@cornell.edu with questions about this module.

    This template provides a format for PMEP DLC courses. Content can be copied and pasted into new modules.

    This module discusses integrated pest management for insect pests of field corn. It focuses on correct insect pest identification, lifecycles, and management strategies that can be employed.

    A narrated Powerpoint presentation by Chuck Mohler of the Department of Crop and Soil Science at Cornell University that covers cultivation equipment and timing, and how to best integrate cultivation in an overall weed management program for field crops and vegetables.

    This topic is approved in New York for 1 core re-certification credit. You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 1 hour. The credit is earned after completing the Pre-Test, watching videos, readings, and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. A temporary certificate will be created with an official certificate mailed to the participant.

    This topic is approved in New York for 1 core re-certification credit. You must be logged in and working in the course activities for a minimum of 1 hour. The credit is earned after completing the Pre-Test, watching videos, readings, and studying the content of the module, then successfully completing the Post-Test. A temporary certificate will be created with an official certificate mailed to the participant.

    Water is one of our most important resources. The Earth's freshwater is stored in lakes, rivers, and streams or below ground in aquifers. Pesticide contamination of water is of great concern from many perspectives. This site provides information on nature of water, how it may become contaminated with pesticides, and how contamination can be prevented

    During this course we will be exploring the importance of scouting in the production of agricultural crops. Examples will be based primarily on grape production but the concepts are fairly universal and should be relevant whether you are growing Brussels sprouts or apples or grapes destined for the juice, wine or fresh market.

    Here's what we hope you learn:

    • The importance of scouting in the production of agriculture.
    • The major components that make up a scouting program
    • Resources available through the NYS IPM Program for scouting programs

    This information was prepared by Tim Weigle. Contact him at thw4@cornell.edu with questions about this module.

    A narrated Powerpoint by Chrisy Hoepting of the Cornell Vegetable Program that covers identification, biology, and management of swede midge, an insect pest of crucifers recently introduced into the United States.

    A look at all the aspects of IPM methods for sweet corn in the Northeast.

    A program designed to update green industry professionals about the early detection and integrated management of theWeed suppressive Groundcovers.

    Did you know that over 400 species of wild bees live in New York State, and honey bees are just one species?  Many of these other bees, not just honey bees, provide critical pollination services. This module begins with a general introduction to pollination and society's need for resilient pollination services, particularly in light of threats to honey bee health. It then introduces the general characteristics of wild bees and specifically highlights a few of the most interesting and useful wild bee species. The presenters will outline the multiple threats facing our bees, discuss the specific risks posed by insecticide and fungicide exposure and how pesticides can interact with other stressors that bees face. Finally, mitigation strategies to minimize harm to bees, taking into account their biology, habits, and points of vulnerability, will be discussed.

    Participants who complete this course will gain an understanding of the basic biology of the grape berry moth as well as the various attempts at managing this pest over the past 30 years.   This course covers why growers should care about grape berry moth, the grape berry moth life cycle, GBM Risk Assessment development and implementation, management options that have been implemented as well as some which have been tried, but failed, and finally the GBM model on NEWA and how it can be used in a vineyard IPM strategy. 

    Participants who complete this course will have an understanding of what NEWA is, what information it provides and how to implement the weather and pest model information into a vineyard IPM strategy. This course also provides information on how NEWA resources, in conjunction with scouting and spray records, can be used when troubleshooting problems with a vineyard IPM strategy.

    Participants who complete this course will gain an understanding of the basic biology of the latest invasive species to hit the eastern United States, spotted lanternfly. An overview is provided of why everyone should be concerned with the potential damage spotted lanternfly can cause to forests, agriculture and tourism industries as well as our quality of life. This course covers spotted lanternfly biology and identification, pathways and spread and monitoring and management strategies currently available for this pest.

    Just a test course for Ashley

    This site is for active CCE Suffolk MGV's and Emeriti to explore resources and find useful information that will enhance their volunteer experience.

    Overview

    The Safe and Affordable School Grounds and Sports Fields Short Course (Safe School Grounds Short Course) is designed to provide comprehensive safety training in natural and synthetic turf maintenance. The goal of the course is to increase the competency of School Grounds Personnel, Facility Managers, Coaches, Athletic Directors, and Administrators in the essential aspects of maintaining turfgrass areas to maximize access and safety.

     

    Learning Objectives

    1. Understand the fundamental concepts of native, manufactured, engineered and blended soils used for turfgrass systems.
    2. Identify common grasses used as turf with a basic understanding of their adaptation, use, management, and improvements through the development of new varieties.
    3. Develop basic school grounds and sports turf problem solving skills unique to the human-built environment by understanding urban grassland ideal growing environments.
    4. Be able to explain pest management that is less reliant on chemical inputs to a school district member.
    5. Understand the measurable aspects of field safety and performance along with allied maintenance practices designed to provide resilient playing surfaces.

    Develop basic proficiency in the safety and proper use of school grounds and sports field equipment including but not limited product application, mowing, irrigation, and turfgrass establishment from seed and sod.

    Collaborative Work Space for the Strategic Plan Team that is focused on Refining Goal Statements & Creating Measurable Outcomes


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